Saving Lives Together

Papers about Speed

The Safe Speed principle includes ensuring speed limits and travel speeds reflect the safety of the road infrastructure by:
  • Undertaking speed enforcement and education.
  • Establishing speed limits according to the features of the road and roadside, vehicle crash-worthiness and the functional performance and known limits of the road user.
The relationship between speed management and projected traffic volumes on major roads along the WA network (2019)

The aim of this research was to identify high speed roads within 400 km of Perth that are at risk of experiencing increased serious crashes due to an increase in traffic volume or are already have a high crash risk rating. Then to identify to what extent reducing the speed limits on these roads would reduce that crash risk.

The research found:

  • 79 roads could be classified as high risk, with a further 12 expected to become high risk in the next 10 years due to an increase in traffic volume.
  • Reducing the average speed travelled on these roads would affect the crash outcomes.

Road safety benefit:
The research was beneficial to the extent that Government received a report that identified roads within 400 km of Perth that already are or are likely to become high crash risk roads. The report recommended measures including community engagement, infrastructure improvements, promotion of vehicle technology and reduction of speed limits to counteract the rising crash risk.

Speed management and projected traffic volumes

Trends in driver speed behaviours on rural road network from 2000 - 2018 (2019)Trends in driver speed behaviours on Perth metropolitan road network from 2000 - 2018 (2019)Development of new strategic directions for the ATE program in Western Australia, Stage 3: A new resource allocation and expansion model (2018)
This project applied the results from the evaluation of the ATE program to provide a detailed cost-benefit analysis that can be used to inform decisions for the expansion and optimisation of the program to further reduce serious crashes.

Road safety benefit:
  • The research provided insight into optimal operating practices for mobile speed cameras in terms of site coverage and revisitation frequency.
  • It identified the potential use of mobile, point to point camera systems.
  • The report provided a cost-benefit analysis.
The analysis notes any decisions about further expansion will be taken in the context of the overall approach to road safety and speed enforcement as one part of an overall approach.

Development of new strategic directions for the ATE program in Western Australia, Stage 3: A new resource allocation and expansion model

Rural Intersection Active Warning System: A driving simulator study (2018)
Rural Intersection Active Warning Systems warn drivers on regional highways when other drivers are approaching on minor roads.

The aim of this research was to evaluate driver performance while navigating through a Rural Intersection Active Warning System (RIAWS) compared to a traditional signed intersection, without signs, using a laboratory-based driving simulator. The simulator was completed by 100 drivers aged between 18-80 years with a current WA C class licence.

The aim of this research was to evaluate driver performance while navigating through a Rural Intersection Active Warning System (RIAWS) compared to a traditional signed intersection, without signs, using a laboratory-based driving simulator. The simulator was completed by 100 drivers aged between 18-80 years with a current WA C class licence.

Road safety benefit:
The research found that RIAWS “80km/h” sign provided the most effective option for reducing driver speeds on approach to rural intersections and recommended that these signs (and not the RIAWS “slow down” signs) are considered for implementation at suitable rural sites in WA.

The research also recommended that further research is undertaken to determine the most effective placement of the RIAWS “80km/h” signs and how they perform on curved WA roads.

Rural Intersection Active Warning System: A driving simulator study (2018)

Development of new strategic directions for the ATE program in WA, point to point safety camera zones in Western Australia, Stage 2: Candidate locations (2017)
Working from the results of the Stage 1 inquiry, the researchers:
  • Mapped possible strategies to optimise operating practices for mobile speed cameras in terms of site coverage and revisitation frequency;
  • Examined the potential use of point to point camera systems, including considering potential locations; and
  • Considered options to expand the ATE program in Western Australia.
Road safety benefit:
  • The report allows for evidence-based decision making in ATE.

Development of new strategic directions for the ATE program in WA, point to point safety camera zones in Western Australia, Stage 2: Candidate locations

An evaluation of the effectiveness of high speed seagull intersections in the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia (2016)
Seagull islands are a common 'at-grade' treatment for three legged T-intersections used on high traffic volume roads and dual carriageways in countries such as Australia, New Zealand and the United States.

The aim of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of high speed seagull intersections on WA roads located in the metropolitan area.
 
The research found that the treatment was effective on Marmion Avenue, reducing all reported crashes by 21.4% and casualty crashes by 62.4%.
 
The treatment could potentially also be effective on roads of similar conditions and characteristics, but there no definitive conclusion for roads with different conditions, pending the availability of more usable data for future research.
 
Road safety benefit:
This research was beneficial to the extent that it provides Government with a review of a potential counter-measure.
As there were difficulties with the assessment, the recommendations include:
  • Better data keeping as to the location of this intersection type.
  • Further research with larger data sets.

An evaluation of the effectiveness of high speed seagull intersections in the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia

An evaluation of automated traffic enforcement operations in Western Australia, 1995 - 2013 (2015)
The aim of this study was to review traffic enforcement undertaken with camera based automated systems in Western Australia.

Road safety benefit:
  • Overall, the ATE program was associated with a 5.6% reduction in serious casualty crashes.
  • The research identified specific trends in crash rates at fixed freeway sites, fixed intersection sites and mobile camera sites.

An evaluation of automated traffic enforcement operations in Western Australia, 1995 - 2013